Tag Archives: Growing medical marijuana

Marijuana Horticulture: The Indoor/Outdoor Medical Grower’s Bible Grow Marijuana At Home The Easy Way

Growing Marijuana at home the easy way

Grow Marijuana at home

Easy Way To Grow Marijuana at home

With 512 full color pages and 1120 full color photographs and illustrations, Marijuana Horticulture: The Indoor/Outdoor Medical Grower’s Bible is the most complete cultivation book available. The Fifth Edition of the former Indoor Marijuana Horticulture: The Indoor Bible was originally published in 1983, when it immediately became a best seller. More than 500,000 copies of the Indoor Bible are in print in Dutch, English, French, German and Spanish.

New greenhouse and outdoor growing chapters make this a book both indoor and outdoor growers will keep under thumb. The other 15 chapters (17 total) are all updated with the most current information, completely rewritten and significantly expanded. For example, Dr. John McPartland contributed an all new medical section – The books credits list more than 300 contributors and reads like a who’s who in the world of cannabis cultivation.

With amazing results on growing marijuana at home, this book got incredible reviews

==== >Buy It TODAY !<===

Yes it is from 2006 but is still the premier source book today !

5 Ways To Increase Male Sex Drive Naturally With Food, Herbal Supplements And Exercise

A man who feels his sex drive is flagging with weak erections and low sexual desire may immediately turn to his doctor for a prescription pill. Unfortunately, medication manufactured by pharmaceutical companies does nothing to address the causes of low male libido and erection problems. Furthermore, depending on a drug in order to make love is not necessary once you know how to improve your libido naturally.

Low male libido can be caused by poor diet, high blood pressure, bad circulation, hormonal imbalances, medication and drug use. Smoking, alcohol and junk food, prescription medication and being overweight are the symptoms of a poor lifestyle which can negatively impact a man’s sexual desire and tends to weaken erections as the years pass.

Instead of seeking out help and taking risks with pharmaceutical pills which can have dangerous side effects, a natural approach to solving erection problems makes far more sense. Rather than having to depend on a pill and prescription, taking care of what you eat, drink and how you exercise is the perfect place to start. The following advice is designed to help you on the road back to a healthy, strong male libido lifestyle, where you don’t have to depend on prescription pills to achieve solid erections.

1. Exercise for high libido

Once a man reaches his 30s, his metabolism tends to slow down, testosterone levels decrease and the body can become congested. This causes a dip in libido in many men by the time they reach their mid or late 30s. For other men, this can happen at 40 years old. Libido problems are also possible in young men who have poor masturbation habits and who have used recreational drugs too often too young.

Whether you’re young or old, exercising is essential for maintaining a good healthy libido and hard erections. Long, slow workouts are effectively useless. Opt for short, sharp and intense workouts that burn fat at a high rate. Concentrate on circuit training that both burns fat and builds muscle mass. As a result, your body will benefit from improved circulation and higher levels of testosterone from building muscle. Make sure that intense workouts of 45-60 minutes are performed 3 times a week at least. Light exercise in the sunlight (walking at midday) can be done on alternate days for better results.

2. Food for high sex drive

Many men are aware that some foods help to boost their libido. Oysters, which contain zinc are a great example. However, not everyone can afford or even enjoys eating oysters. Instead, stay close to a Paleo regime and avoid white carbs such as pasta, bread and white rice. Increase the intake of vegetables (broccoli, celery, asparagus), raw fruits (bananas) and fish (salmon, anchovies, sardines). Chicken, beef and nuts on occasions are also helpful for boosting libido. Avoid junk food completely and take care to consume only very low amounts of cheese, sugar foods (desserts) and chocolate.

3. Lifestyle for strong sexual desire

Alcohol, recreational drugs (marijuana, ecstasy, cocaine) and prescription medication can all have undesirable side effects when it comes to male libido. Although the libido may not be impacted immediately, after some time the body feels the effect of excessive drinking, smoking cannabis or other street drugs. Low libido can still occur after a man is completely free of any drug use.

Medication used to help regulate blood pressure or control depression can also cause libido problems. If possible, talk to your doctor about changing or stopping any regular medication. Research every drug that you take or might take in the future for potential side effects.

4. Herbal supplements for good sex

Herbal supplements are derived from natural plants and herbs and can be very beneficial when trying to boost libido. The ideal way of taking herbal supplements is to take several different ones and alternate them. Many herbs exist: some boost testosterone, others improve circulation and others act as aphrodisiacs.

5. Detox for best results

Many men, young and old have congested livers that prevent their body functioning as it should do. Pesticides in foods, packaged foods, pollution, drugs and alcohol all conspire to make our livers work harder. After some time, the negative effects can be observed on the libido.

To get optimal results and hard erections that occur more frequently, detoxing the liver with natural herbs and foods can be highly beneficial. The liver can regenerate itself faster with the help of milk thistle and an improved diet. A healthy libido is the desired result that can be obtained by detoxing the liver and the body.



Source by Jonathan Remington Smythe

Prescription Drug Addiction Has Become a Growing Epidemic

Thirty-one of 75 patients hospitalized for opioid detoxification told physicians they first became addicted to drugs legitimately prescribed for pain. Another 24 patients started their addiction with prescription pills from a friend or a parent’s medicine cabinet. The remaining 20 patients said they became addicted on street drugs.

This information was reported to physicians at the University of Buffalo. Ninety two percent of the patients in the study said they eventually purchased drugs off the street, primarily heroin, because it is cheaper and more effective than prescription drugs.

They told the physicians that they continued using drugs because they “helped to take away my emotional pain and stress,” “to feel normal,” or “to feel like a better person.”

The information will be used to train medical students and residents at the University of Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and practicing physicians to screen for potential addiction among their patients, and to direct patients to a treatment program if necessary.

Abuse of prescribed drugs is the biggest drug-related threat to the health and safety of Floridians. The 2009 Florida Medical Examiner’s Report revealed that overdoses from prescription drugs kill seven Floridians each day. This is five times greater than deaths from all illegal drugs combined.

The explosion of pain clinics in Florida has contributed to the problem. Many of these are “pill mills” where drugs are traded for money. Florida has become popular for drug-seekers from other states to come and get a supply of prescription drugs.

According to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 70 percent of people who abuse prescription drugs get their supply from their friends and family. Other patients receive their prescription drugs from one physician. Many others “doctor shop” to receive their prescriptions for pain medication. Stolen, forged or counterfeit prescriptions are a common way addicts get their supply of prescription drugs.

In January, Florida convened a Statewide Prescription Drug Task Force made up of several state agencies and charged them with finding solutions to the problem. In conjunction with federal agencies, the Task Force has accelerated their attack on the criminal activity that often surround prescription drug use.

A law, SB 2272, was passed that granted greater authority for health officials to regulate the pain clinics in Florida. The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program will begin in December. It will allow physicians to look at their patient’s prescription history. As a result, potential “doctor shoppers” will be discouraged.



Source by Dane Alan Peterson

Alcohol and a Top Secret Tip to Reverse the Damage

Who wants a spotty face and run down eyes? Sound Good? Drinking can effect the way you look in some rather unpleasant ways. Let’s take a look at the effects of alcohol.

Alcohol reeks havoc on your sleeping pattern and is especially harmful to your skin. When you glance in the mirror, the morning after a drinking session, chances are the person you see staring back at you won’t be the same as the night before. Consuming too much alcohol can negatively impact your physical appearance the day after and also have longer lasting effects.

Alcohol will make you fat. Each 175ml medium glass of wine contains approximately 125 calories; the number gets closer to 600 in a whole bottle. Cocktails, Beer and spirits are even more calorie dense. One of two drinks is the calorific equivalent to a king size bar of chocolate.

And it’s not just your waistline that will be a cause for concern. Alcohol prevents your body and mind for getting the ‘full spectrum’ sleep that you need.

The mirror never lies

Anyone who has experienced the joy of a hangover will be fully aware that the mirror can be quite unforgiving the morning after a night out. Your skin probably looks paler, dull and tired. Dr. Goad from the British Association of Dermatologists states:

“Alcohol dehydrates your body generally, including the skin, which is your body’s largest organ. This happens every time you drink. “Alcohol is also known to rob the skin of certain essential vitamins and nutrients,” she adds. At least females have the option of make-up to disguise the hangover tell-tale signs.

But that is only the beginning. Drinking more than is recommended over time can have other, much more permanent, detrimental effects on your skin. Rosacea, a skin disorder that starts with a tendency to blush and flush easily and can eventually lead to facial disfigurement, is linked to alcohol.

“One of the consequences of alcohol is to dilate the tiny blood vessels in the skin, which can make the skin appear redder,” says Goad. “The central areas of the face can become studded with small red bumps and pus spots, which come and go in crops. Small dilated blood vessels also appear, looking like thin red streaks.”

Bloating of the face.

Alcohol may result in you face becoming bloated and puffy looking. You may notice that your stomach becomes bloated too. And let’s not forget cellulite; there are many who believe alcohol’s toxins build up to contribute towards this. If this isn’t the look your going for and your drinking heavily there are steps you can take to cut down and make improvements.

What’s the Smell?

Yep there’s more. People with hangover tend to have a bit of a stench about them. The liver is responsible for metabolizing most of the alcohol, but anywhere from 5-10% will exit the body via your mouth (bad breath?), sweat and waste products (urine and err… you know)

If you were to drunk to get your make up off before bed, you’re a lot more likely to get some loverly spots too. Never mind the dull, bloodshot eyes.

So we’ve established that maybe the hungover look isn’t for you, never mind the look of being a heavy drinker over many years. Here’s 3 proven tips to help prevent any of this from ever happening.

1. Stop or cut down on your drinking. Perhaps rather obviously this will have the most profound effect on your overall health and looks. Consider this one carefully, can you maybe just drink less or do you even need to drink at all?

2. Adopt a healthier diet. A good diet is crucial to you maintaining your looks. Start with getting in plenty of fruits and vegetables, the vitamins and anti-oxidants will do you wonders. Good quality lean protein such as chicken breasts, tuna, and low fat beef combined with complex carbohydrates like brown rice and whole meal bread will take care of the rest.

3. Take a health supplement made from AFA that contains brain energizing Omega 3 fatty acids and has the ability to dramatically improve your health and well being. AFA has been given to astronauts by NASA to repair the damage done to their brains from gong into space. This supplement will not only help you preserve your looks and health but will also help you to reverse any damage and reverse the effects of alcohol.



Source by Adam Souba

Prescription Drug Addiction Has Become a Growing Epidemic

Thirty-one of 75 patients hospitalized for opioid detoxification told physicians they first became addicted to drugs legitimately prescribed for pain. Another 24 patients started their addiction with prescription pills from a friend or a parent’s medicine cabinet. The remaining 20 patients said they became addicted on street drugs.

This information was reported to physicians at the University of Buffalo. Ninety two percent of the patients in the study said they eventually purchased drugs off the street, primarily heroin, because it is cheaper and more effective than prescription drugs.

They told the physicians that they continued using drugs because they “helped to take away my emotional pain and stress,” “to feel normal,” or “to feel like a better person.”

The information will be used to train medical students and residents at the University of Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and practicing physicians to screen for potential addiction among their patients, and to direct patients to a treatment program if necessary.

Abuse of prescribed drugs is the biggest drug-related threat to the health and safety of Floridians. The 2009 Florida Medical Examiner’s Report revealed that overdoses from prescription drugs kill seven Floridians each day. This is five times greater than deaths from all illegal drugs combined.

The explosion of pain clinics in Florida has contributed to the problem. Many of these are “pill mills” where drugs are traded for money. Florida has become popular for drug-seekers from other states to come and get a supply of prescription drugs.

According to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 70 percent of people who abuse prescription drugs get their supply from their friends and family. Other patients receive their prescription drugs from one physician. Many others “doctor shop” to receive their prescriptions for pain medication. Stolen, forged or counterfeit prescriptions are a common way addicts get their supply of prescription drugs.

In January, Florida convened a Statewide Prescription Drug Task Force made up of several state agencies and charged them with finding solutions to the problem. In conjunction with federal agencies, the Task Force has accelerated their attack on the criminal activity that often surround prescription drug use.

A law, SB 2272, was passed that granted greater authority for health officials to regulate the pain clinics in Florida. The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program will begin in December. It will allow physicians to look at their patient’s prescription history. As a result, potential “doctor shoppers” will be discouraged.



Source by Dane Alan Peterson

Nevada Drug Possession, Sale and Trafficking Laws

The impact for a drug conviction can be severe for misdemeanor and felony offenses in Nevada. With the widespread use of background checks, a conviction can shut many doors for future employment opportunities. Certain fields may be especially thorough with background checks and will disqualify individuals with drug convictions. This includes many healthcare fields, law enforcement agencies, and other government bodies. Given what is at stake, it is important to understand the Nevada drug laws, even if you are being represented by a defense attorney.

Currently, Nevada laws severely punish individuals arrested for possession, manufacturing, cultivation and trafficking of illegal drugs. Commonly used drugs in this list include cocaine, heroin, opium, LSD, ecstasy and a variety of other narcotics. Chapter 453 of the Nevada Controlled Substances Act defines the schedule of drugs, offenses and penalties in the state. Some of the defined offenses are:

  • NRS 453.316 – Maintaining a place for unlawful sale, gift or use of a controlled substance
  • NRS 453.321 – Offer, attempt, or commission of unauthorized acts relating to controlled substances
  • NRS 453.322 – Offer, attempt, or commission of manufacturing or compounding of controlled substances
  • NRS 453.331 – Distribution of controlled substances, use of unauthorized registration number and possession of signed blank prescription forms
  • NRS 453.333 – Second or subsequence offense for selling a controlled substance to a minor
  • NRS 453.336 – Unlawful possession not for purpose of sale
  • NRS 453.337 – Unlawful possession for sale of flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and schedule I or II substances
  • NRS 453.338 – Unlawful possession for sale of schedule III, IV, or V substances
  • NRS 453.3385 – Trafficking in controlled substances Trafficking in controlled substances: Rohypnol, GHB, and schedule I substances (not including marijuana)
  • NRS 453.339 – Marijuana trafficking

Penalties for drug crimes in Nevada can vary, depending on the specific criminal offense, circumstances of the arrest, amount of illegal drugs involved, previous criminal history of the alleged offender, and strength of the defense or prosecution’s case. Under Nevada’s Controlled Substances act, the most common offenses may be punished as follows:

Drug Possession, Not For Sale

  • Class E Felony (1st or 2nd offense,schedule I, II, III, or IV) – 1 to 4 years in state prison or probation and/or up to $5,000 in fines
  • Class D Felony (3rd or subsequent offense, schedule I, II, III, or IV) – between 1 and 4 years in state prison and/or up to $5,000 in fines
  • Class E Felony (1st offense, schedule V) – between 1 and 4 years in prison or probation and/or fines up to $5,000
  • Class D Felony (2nd or subsequent offense, schedule V) – 1 to 4 years in Nevada state prison and/or up to $5,000 in fines

Unlawful Possession of Schedule I or II Drugs, Rohypnol, or GHB

  • 1st offense, category D felony – 1 to 4 years in state prison and/or up to $5,000 in fines
  • 2nd offense, category C felony – between 1 and 4 non-probational years in Nevada state prison and/or up to $10,000 of fines
  • 3rd or subsequent offense, category B felony – punishable by 3 to 15 non-probational years in state prison and/or a fine of up to $20,000 for each offense

Unlawful Possession for Sale of Schedule III, IV, or V Drugs

  • 1st and second offense, category D felony – punishable by 1 to 4 non-probational years in state prison and/or up to $10,000 in fines
  • 3rd or subsequent offense, category C felony – can be punished by 1 to 5 non-probational years in Nevada state prison and/or up to $10,000 in fines

Drug Trafficking (Schedule I)

  • Category B Felony (between 4 and 14 grams) – Punishable by 1 to 6 non-probational (mandatory prison) years in Nevada State Prison and/or up to $50,000 in fines
  • Category B Felony (between 14 and 28 grams) – Punishable by 2 to 15 non-probational (mandatory prison) years in Nevada State Prison and/or up to $100,000 in fines
  • Category A Felony (28 grams or more) – Punishable by 25 non-probational (mandatory prison) years to life and a fine of up to $500,000

However, Nevada has surprisingly moved to a certain level of acceptance regarding marijuana, along with many other states in the country. Nevada decriminalized the use of medical marijuana in 2001 when 65% of the state’s voters moved to amend the state’s constitution to recognize its legitimate use in a medical capacity. However, to remain in compliance with the state law, medical marijuana users must have documented permission from a physician.

Once registered with the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services: State Health Division, the individual can use, possess and grow marijuana to a certain extent (up to 1 ounce possession and up to 7 plants cultivated, only 3 of which can be mature). Note that Nevada has not decriminalized the use of marijuana for the general population like other states such as California, Connecticut and Mississippi have.

Currently there are several legal battles going on regarding the medical marijuana laws and how people can obtain medical marijuana. As the law stands today a person must produce their own medical marijuana to legally obtain medical marijuana. A person cannot get it from a centralized location like a dispensary. Additionally, even though the State of Nevada has approved the use of medical marijuana, the Federal government has not, and is starting to invoke Federal Law against those people using and growing medical marijuana. Be aware that even though you might be following State laws you can be arrested and convicted for violating Federal laws.

Possession of marijuana by non-approved medical users is still a serious criminal offense. Under Nevada’s Controlled Substances Act, possession of non-medical marijuana offense can result in the following punishments:

Possession of 1 Ounce or Less of Marijuana

  • 1st offense, misdemeanor – Fine up to $600 or drug abuse treatment examination
  • 2nd offense, misdemeanor – Fine up to $1000 or drug treatment/rehabilitation program
  • 3rd offense, gross misdemeanor – Up to 1 year in county jail and/or up to $2000 in fines
  • 4th or subsequent offense, category E felony – between 1 and 4 years in state prison or probation and/or a fine up to $5,000

It’s important to remember that an arrest for a drug-related crime does not necessarily mean a conviction will follow, regardless if the individual was charged with a misdemeanor or felony offense. If you have a defense attorney experienced in Nevada drug cases, he or she can use many of the details surrounding the case to your benefit. This can include improper search and investigation procedure, lack of probable cause to make a stop (in cases of vehicular arrests), constitutional right violations, competency of witnesses, and other miscellaneous facts.

Pleading guilty to a drug crime does not necessarily mean the defendant will receive a lighter sentence. Many individuals facing this situation also find it beneficial to retain an attorney from the moment of arrest, regardless of their state of innocence. Prosecution and law enforcement officials do not have the best interests of the accused in mind and details may be overlooked in their pursuit of justice. It is in your best interest to consult with a Nevada defense attorney about your legal options.



Source by Joel M Mann